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Opening a Folder from the Dock

Sick of the dock on Mac OS X Leopard not being able to open folders with a simple click, like sanity demands and like it used to be in Tiger? You can, of course click it, and then click again on Open in Finder, but that's twice as many clicks as it used to be. (And while you're at it, Control-click the folder, and choose both Display as Folder and View Content as List from the contextual menu. Once you have the content displaying as a list, there's an Open command right there, but that requires Control-clicking and choosing a menu item.) The closest you can get to opening a docked folder with a single click is Command-click, which opens its enclosing folder. However, if you instead put a file from the docked folder in the Dock, and Command-click that file, you'll see the folder you want. Of course, if you forget to press Command when clicking, you'll open the file, which may be even more annoying.

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Apple Acknowledges Guest Account Data Loss Bug

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Apple has officially acknowledged a serious, though rare, data-erasing bug in Snow Leopard that's triggered by use of the guest account. When logging into the guest account, if the computer hangs, it is possible that, upon returning to your primary account, you'll find that all of the files and folders in your user account have been erased and that your account has been reset to default settings. Your account's path still exists on the hard drive, but everything has been erased from within it.

Apple responded to CNET's coverage of this bug with a prepared statement, saying only, "We are aware of the issue, which occurs only in extremely rare cases, and we are working on a fix." It's likely that we'll see Mac OS X 10.6.2 soon, perhaps sooner than it would have appeared otherwise, due to the severity of this bug.

The three main discussion threads in the Account and Login forum on Apple's site are over 25,000 views and 100 replies as of this writing. Those are substantial numbers, but don't indicate a tremendously widespread problem, though that is likely due more to the generally infrequent use of guest accounts than the consistency of the bug's behavior.

At this point, the specifics of how to reproduce the problem aren't clear, since most of the details have originated in discussion forums. For example, does the problem occur if you use fast user switching, if you log in from the Login window, or both? If you have two admin-level accounts and log into the guest account, are both erased?

Until a fix becomes available, we recommend disabling the guest account temporarily by unchecking both "Allow guests..." checkboxes when configuring the guest account in the Accounts preference pane. This should eliminate even accidental use.


Finally, consider this just one more reason to always be sure you have an up-to-date backup of at least your home folder, whether via Time Machine or another backup program!

 

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Comments about Apple Acknowledges Guest Account Data Loss Bug

Ken Cohen  2009-10-14 16:03
Hate to sound like "I told you so", but this is why I never upgrade to a major O/S revision until at least version 10.N.2 or 10.N.3. (unfortunately I have to use a PC as well as my Macs - I luckily never did change to Vista and I'll wait a few months for Windows 7 to mature.)
John Baxter  An apple icon for a Friend of TidBITS 2009-10-21 16:49
Not only "a current backup" but a backup that includes archival stuff one way or another.

If you just "sync" and think that's good enough, your "backup" will have its files erased before you notice that your account is empty (or soon enough that the difference doesn't matter).