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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse


Apple Updates Mac Pro and Xserve Configuration Options

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Apple has quietly updated its Mac Pro and Xserve lines with new configurations. The Mac Pro quad-core model now includes the option to replace the base configuration's 2.66 GHz Intel Xeon processor with a 3.33 GHz Intel Xeon. Price? $1,200 for the processor swap.

Newly available in both the quad-core Mac Pro and the eight-core model is the option to replace each of the base configuration's hard drives with 2 TB 7200 rpm drives. This brings the maximum capacity of the Mac Pro up to 8 TB, from 4 TB, and does so at the price of $350 for the first drive, and $550 for each subsequent drive.

Apple's Xserve lineup sees the same 2 TB hard drive upgrade option, at the price of $450 for the first drive and $550 for each subsequent drive. (Xserve drives are more expensive than Mac Pro drives due to the drive carriers and other reasons; see "Going Deep Inside Xserve Apple Drive Modules," 27 March 2009.) The new option brings the Xserve's maximum capacity to 6 TB, up from 3 TB.

Also, new to the Xserve quad-core model is the option to configure the machine with 24 GB of RAM, or 4 GB per slot, at the hefty price of $2,850. (The eight-core Xserve model features 12 RAM slots instead of the quad-core's 6 slots.)

Now that the iMac boasts substantial specs (see "New iMac Models Receive Larger Screens, SD Card Slot," 20 October 2009), upgrade options such as these help further define the Mac Pro and Xserve as the powerhouses of Apple's product line.


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Comments about Apple Updates Mac Pro and Xserve Configuration Options
(Comments are closed.)

Mac Guy  2009-12-08 18:51
Pardon me for feeling a little lost here, but the 8-core systems have 12 RAM slots. That gives a max of 48 GB of RAM, not 24.

That's been there for a while...
Adam Engst  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2009-12-10 13:45
Oops, sorry, we've clarified this. Odd of Apple to reduce the number of RAM slots in the quad-core machines.
stevew  2010-02-01 18:35
Mac Pro 8-core purchased 12-31-2009 has 2 x 4 slots for a total of 8. 2 x 3 = Six matched RAM runs DDR3. 2 x 4 matched RAM runs DDR2. You need to decide whether you want pure speed or more room.