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Opening a Folder from the Dock

Sick of the dock on Mac OS X Leopard not being able to open folders with a simple click, like sanity demands and like it used to be in Tiger? You can, of course click it, and then click again on Open in Finder, but that's twice as many clicks as it used to be. (And while you're at it, Control-click the folder, and choose both Display as Folder and View Content as List from the contextual menu. Once you have the content displaying as a list, there's an Open command right there, but that requires Control-clicking and choosing a menu item.) The closest you can get to opening a docked folder with a single click is Command-click, which opens its enclosing folder. However, if you instead put a file from the docked folder in the Dock, and Command-click that file, you'll see the folder you want. Of course, if you forget to press Command when clicking, you'll open the file, which may be even more annoying.

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New York Times Info-Graphic on Facebook Privacy Options

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The brouhaha surrounding privacy on Facebook continues to expand, with the New York Times producing a fascinating info-graphic that shows just how complex Facebook has made the topic, with 50 settings containing over 170 options. And the Facebook privacy policy? It's longer than the U.S. Constitution.favicon follow link

 

Comments about New York Times Info-Graphic on Facebook Privacy Options
(Comments are closed.)

It's a bit like the User Agreement for iTunes. I tried to download an app from my iPhone but before I could proceed I need to agree to the updated user agreement, which was approximately 70 pages of fine print - thankfully there was an option to have it emailed to my account instead!
Adam Engst  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2010-05-25 08:03
Yeah, maybe there should be a requirement that end-user agreements must have a plain English version that's no more than X words.