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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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The brouhaha surrounding privacy on Facebook continues to expand, with the New York Times producing a fascinating info-graphic that shows just how complex Facebook has made the topic, with 50 settings containing over 170 options. And the Facebook privacy policy? It's longer than the U.S. Constitution.favicon follow link

 

Comments about New York Times Info-Graphic on Facebook Privacy Options

It's a bit like the User Agreement for iTunes. I tried to download an app from my iPhone but before I could proceed I need to agree to the updated user agreement, which was approximately 70 pages of fine print - thankfully there was an option to have it emailed to my account instead!
Adam Engst  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2010-05-25 08:03
Yeah, maybe there should be a requirement that end-user agreements must have a plain English version that's no more than X words.