Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Pick an apple! 
 
Turn Off Filename Extension Warning

In Leopard, Apple fixed an annoying aspect of working with the Finder in Tiger. Previously, if you changed a file's extension, the Finder prompted for confirmation. But since no one has ever accidentally changed a filename extension, Apple thankfully added an option to turn that warning off in the Leopard Finder's preferences. Choose Finder > Preferences, and in the Advanced screen, deselect Show Warning Before Changing an Extension.

 

 

Related Articles

 

 

Apple Catches Up With Microsoft in Market Cap

Send Article to a Friend

We've come a long way since the dark days of 1997, when Michael Dell said that if it were up to him, he'd "fix" Apple by shutting the company down and giving the money back to shareholders. I joked in our April Fools issue this year that Apple could now buy Dell with cash, given that Apple has more than $40 billion stashed away, and Dell's market capitalization is well under that ($26 billion at the moment; see "What Apple Could Do with $40 Billion," 1 April 2010).

It was a cheap joke, of course, but I was reminded of it when the news broke last week that Apple's market capitalization has equaled Microsoft's. Put simply, market cap is a company's stock price multiplied by the number of shares, and thus reflects what the public considers the company to be worth. Needless to say, it changes quickly with the stock price, so although Apple's market cap surpassed Microsoft's briefly, the numbers have flip-flopped again, putting Microsoft ahead by a hair as I write this.

More interesting than the horse race of who's ahead at any given moment is the long term view, in which you can see just how far Apple has risen, and how far Microsoft has fallen. It's interesting to note Apple's nearly flat market cap growth from 1999 through 2003, and to think about how the iPod and iPhone and now iPad have helped goose the stock price to the point where Apple's market cap is exceeded significantly in the U.S. by only ExxonMobil's. (As an aside, the chart below comes from YCharts, an extremely slick Web site for viewing financial data; it's well worth a look.)


Perhaps even more telling is Apple's enterprise value, which goes beyond market cap to take into account cash, debt, preferred stock, and more when calculating the market value of a business. Apple is ahead of Microsoft on this metric (at least according to the YCharts data; enterprise value can be a bit tricky to calculate because of how Apple accounts for cash), but it's amazing to see how significant Apple has become in comparison with other mega-corps.

In short, we're not in Kansas any more, Toto, and the Apple of today is a very different - and much more powerful - company than in the early days of the Macintosh.

 

CrashPlan is easy, secure backup that works everywhere. Back up
to your own drives, friends, and online with unlimited storage.
With 30 days free, backing up is one resolution you can keep.
Your life is digital; back it up! <http://tid.bl.it/code42-tb>
 

Comments about Apple Catches Up With Microsoft in Market Cap
(Comments are closed.)

Colin Lamb  2010-05-27 11:42
Having $40 billion in cash laying around is not necessarily a good thing for a tech company. Apple is not a bank. Apple should buy something, or return the money to shareholders.
Money *is* something and having money to do whatever they want is not bad. Additionally, while ROI is a good thing, continued ROI is even better. Apple is doing a great job and the market mirror's that effort.