Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Pick an apple! 
 
View Smart Folder Criteria

Smart Folders, folders that contain the results of a Finder search, typically display without the original search criteria listed. However, you can see the search criteria by selecting Show Search Criteria from the window's Action menu (the gear icon). Additionally, any edits to a smart folder's criteria will automatically be listed the next time you open the folder.

Visit MacTipster blog

Submitted by
Sharon Zardetto

 
 

ExtraBITS for 5 July 2010

Send Article to a Friend

Three quick blips for you this week - Glenn's appearance on the TechFlash podcast, a thought-provoking essay on the move away from "thingness," and some hard numbers on whether it's faster or slower to read on a device like an iPad or Kindle.


Glenn Fleishman on TechFlash about the iPhone and Kindle -- Glenn Fleishman appears on this week's TechFlash podcast. Glenn talks about Apple's odd open letter on antennas, the potential for an iPhone that works with Verizon Wireless's network, and the place of the Kindle in the tablet future. TechFlash is a Seattle technology news site with a strong focus on original reporting.

Read/post comments


It's the Internet, Stupid! -- Blogger Mike Cane has a thought-provoking post about the move away from "thingness," whether you're talking about physical or electronic objects. As thingness becomes less important, he suggests, online access becomes far more important. After all, do people who have Netflix subscriptions still buy as many DVDs? We certainly don't. Worth a read - even if this isn't true of you now, we agree that the world is moving in this direction.

Read/post comments


Jakob Nielsen Tests iPad and Kindle Reading Speeds -- Do you read faster or slower on a device like an iPad or Kindle, in comparison with a physical book? The overall answer, according to usability expert Jakob Nielsen, is about 5 to 10 percent slower (with the same comprehension of what was read). That's statistically significant, though not all that much slower. (We suspect it may have to do with years of familiarity with the form factor of the book.) More interesting was that on a 1 to 7 scale, users rated their satisfaction at 5.8 for the iPad, 5.7 for the Kindle, and 5.6 for the physical book, with the traditional PC trailing behind at only 3.6.

Read/post comments

 

An extra display for just ten bucks!
Air Display 2 lets you use your iPad, iPhone, or nearby Mac as
extra screen real estate for your main computer. Now smarter,
better, and 50 percent faster. <http://avatron.com/tidbits>