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Find Text Leading from Acrobat PDF

Ever have to recreate a document from an Acrobat PDF? You can find out most everything about the text by using the Object Inspector, except the leading. Well, here's a cheesy way to figure it out. Open the PDF in Illustrator (you just need one page). Release any and all clipping masks. Draw a guide at the baseline of the first line of text, and one on the line below. Now, Option-drag the first line to make a copy, and position it exactly next to the original first line at baseline. Then put a return anywhere in the copied line. Now adjust leading of the copied lines, so that the second line of copy rests on the baseline of the second line of the original. Now you know your leading.

Or you could buy expensive software to find the leading. Your choice.

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Greg Ledger

 

 

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DealBITS Drawing: Win a Copy of PDF Shrink 4.5

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One of the aspects of PDF production to which we pay careful attention when creating Take Control ebooks is the size of our PDF files. It may not seem as though a few megabytes matter in today's Internet, but you'd be surprised how many people still work on limited bandwidth connections, and, in fact, the increased use of cellular data connections for iPhones and iPads has made the problem of unnecessarily large files even worse. Plus, email servers often reject attachments over 5 MB, providing yet another reason to compress PDFs. Image-heavy PDFs generated from programs like Keynote and PowerPoint tend to be especially massive, but it's nearly impossible to predict when a PDF might balloon in size. Some of our Take Control ebooks have hit 100 MB before we shrink them to between 1 and 5 MB.

We compress our ebook PDFs using Apago's industrial-strength PDF Enhancer, which also performs other tasks for us. But if you just want to reduce the size of PDFs quickly and easily, Apago's $35 PDF Shrink is all you need. Drop your PDF file on PDF Shrink, and it quickly compresses images in the PDF, and performs various other manipulations that save space while still producing a fully functional and compatible PDF (something that's not true of all tools that can reduce PDF file sizes). You don't need to understand the inner workings of PDF to choose appropriate settings; PDF Shrink takes advantage of multi-core CPUs to process multiple files at once; and you can even feed it an entire folder to process a large number of files in one action.

So if you want to win one of two copies of PDF Shrink 4.5, worth $35, enter at the DealBITS page. All information gathered is covered by our comprehensive privacy policy. Remember too, that if someone you refer to this drawing wins, you'll receive the same prize as a reward for spreading the word.

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Comments about DealBITS Drawing: Win a Copy of PDF Shrink 4.5

Sandy Brockmann  2010-07-20 06:51
PDF SHRINK sounds like my long lost savior! My home job and 6 grandchildren mean I have manuals, instructions, letters, recipes, greeting cards, and help files, galore, all in PDF form. Keeping them organized is accomplished with TOGETHER; keeping them from over-running my 160GB drive is a thankless, impossible task. In addition, my job takes me to Scotland twice a year for a total of three months. Scotland is known for having the worst Internet connectivity in the civilized world (Scottish Government publication, "The South of Scotland was generally recognised to be the worst in terms of current and future commercial telecoms infrastructure provision.") For instance, where I stay, one can't carry on a phone conversation while simultaneously accessing antthing on the Internet at the same time. Bottom Line? The smaller the file, the more likely that file is to get where it's going without encountering either overflow or Internet obstacles. PDF Shrink to the rescue!
Adam Engst  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2010-07-20 11:42
You sound like a poster child for the product - anything to save a few bytes! :-)