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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

ExtraBITS for 1 November 2010

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Two quick links for you this week: one to news of Amazon’s plans to add lending of Kindle titles and another to Jeff Carlson’s iMovie review at Macworld.

Amazon to Debut Kindle Lending and Periodicals in Apps -- Amazon.com has announced that Kindle newspapers and magazines will be available within Kindle apps in the coming weeks, and more interestingly, that lending of Kindle titles will appear later this year, following in Barnes & Noble’s footsteps with the Nook. Each book can be lent once to another Kindle device for 14 days, and you cannot read the book while it’s lent out. Publishers will determine which books are lendable. Will Apple do something similar with the iBookstore? Seems unlikely at the moment.

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Jeff Carlson Reviews iMovie ’11 for Macworld -- iMovie ’11 is a substantial update to the video editor included in iLife ’11, but is it worth the upgrade? Jeff Carlson digs into the details of the new version, uncovering features not mentioned during Apple’s “Back to the Mac” event or on the Web site, explains why it’s worthy of 4.5 mice, and points out ongoing shortcomings.

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