Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Pick an apple! 
 
Springy Dock Tricks

If you drag a file and hover over Dock icons, various useful things happen which are similar to Finder springing. If it's a window, the window un-minimizes from the Dock. If it's a stack, the corresponding folder in the Finder opens. If it's the Finder, it brings the Finder to the foreground and opens a window if one doesn't exist already. But the coolest (and most hidden) springing trick is if you hover over an application and press the Space bar, the application comes to the foreground. This is great for things like grabbing a file from somewhere to drop into a Mail composition window that's otherwise hidden. Grab the file you want, hover over the Mail icon, press the Space bar, and Mail comes to the front for you to drop the file into the compose window. Be sure that Spring-Loaded Folders and Windows is enabled in the Finder Preferences window.

Visit plucky tree

Submitted by
cricket

 
 

ExtraBITS for 15 August 2011

Send Article to a Friend

Just a couple of things to note this week — Google introducing a new way of viewing Gmail’s Web interface with a preview pane and Amazon creating a Web app version of its Kindle software.

Gmail Gains Optional Preview Pane -- For those who read Gmail via its Web interface, including in Mailplane, Google has released a Gmail Labs feature called Preview Pane. It gives Gmail a vertical interface with labels on the left, a vertical list of message summaries in the middle, and the main conversation display pane on the right. It works best with wide screens, though if you have a tall screen, you can switch it to a horizontal split instead of a vertical split. The approach is much more like Gmail’s tablet interface, and in turn like Mail on the iPad.

Read/post comments

Kindle Reading Comes to the Web -- Amazon has created a Web app version of its Kindle reading software for Safari for the iPad, Mac OS X, and Windows, and Chrome for desktops. The app uses HTML5 to mimic the natively written Kindle apps, and does a quite decent job. Amazon leverages HTML5 local storage support to download Kindle titles to the browser, too. This is seen as a workaround by Amazon to bypass Apple’s 30-percent cut of media purchase fees in iOS apps.

Read/post comments

 

CrashPlan is easy, secure backup that works everywhere. Back up
to your own drives, friends, and online with unlimited storage.
With 30 days free, backing up is one resolution you can keep.
Your life is digital; back it up! <http://tid.bl.it/code42-tb>