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iMovie '09: Speed Clips up to 2,000%

iMovie '09 brings back the capability to speed up or slow down clips, which went missing in iMovie '08. Select a clip and bring up the Clip Inspector by double-clicking the clip, clicking the Inspector button on the toolbar, or pressing the I key. Just as with its last appearance in iMovie HD 6, you can move a slider to make the video play back slower or faster (indicated by a turtle or hare icon).

You can also enter a value into the text field to the right of the slider, and this is where things get interesting. You're not limited to the tick mark values on the slider, so you can set the speed to be 118% of normal if you want. The field below that tells you the clip's changed duration.

But you can also exceed the boundaries of the speed slider. Enter any number between 5% and 2000%, then click Done.

Visit iMovie '09 Visual QuickStart Guide

 

 

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New York Times Explains Chinese Advantage for Apple

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The New York Times has a clever feature article explaining why Apple (and other firms) manufacture in China for a host of reasons, of which low wages may be a relatively small part. The ability to hire a massive number of trained people nearly instantly is one factor, regardless of how well those people are treated by the contractors Apple employs. For instance, Americans typically won’t live in dormitories and work six 12-hour days in a row, which is commonplace in China and other developing nations.favicon follow link

 

Comments about New York Times Explains Chinese Advantage for Apple
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artMonster  2012-01-22 20:22
"Americans typically won’t live in dormitories and work six 12-hour days in a row.."

We once did just that in this country. Some soldier's still do. But typically these days, no. Bigger question is, how will this massive Chinese labor force evolve?
Glenn Fleishman  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2012-01-22 20:27
Chinese workers have already successfully pushed for substantial increases in wages in many industries, and there are even shortages of workers. If you raise the standard of living enough, people learn that they should only accept better, not just pine for it.
artMonster  2012-01-22 21:01
Seems the natural progression. Wonder if our great grandkids will be trying to emigrate to China?