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iMovie '09: Speed Clips up to 2,000%

iMovie '09 brings back the capability to speed up or slow down clips, which went missing in iMovie '08. Select a clip and bring up the Clip Inspector by double-clicking the clip, clicking the Inspector button on the toolbar, or pressing the I key. Just as with its last appearance in iMovie HD 6, you can move a slider to make the video play back slower or faster (indicated by a turtle or hare icon).

You can also enter a value into the text field to the right of the slider, and this is where things get interesting. You're not limited to the tick mark values on the slider, so you can set the speed to be 118% of normal if you want. The field below that tells you the clip's changed duration.

But you can also exceed the boundaries of the speed slider. Enter any number between 5% and 2000%, then click Done.

Visit iMovie '09 Visual QuickStart Guide


Final Cut Pro X 10.0.3

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Apple has updated Final Cut Pro X to version 10.0.3, a minor version number adjustment that doesn’t properly convey the scope of significant changes to the professional video editor. Introduced to controversy last year, Final Cut Pro X 10.0 was a ground-up rewrite that lacked capabilities found in Final Cut Pro 7. Now, this third minor update restores some of those features. Multicam editing tops the list, with support for up to 64 camera angles (Apple’s Top Features page offers an impressive video of how multicam works, including automatic synchronization using the tracks’ audio). Also new are advanced chroma keying controls, a media relink feature to reconnect projects and events to new media, the capability to open layered Photoshop files directly, a beta version of broadcast monitoring with third-party PCIe and Thunderbolt devices, and more. Now we’ll see if pros who shunned Final Cut Pro X at first reconsider the app for future projects. ($299.99 new, free update, 1.37 GB, release notes)


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Comments about Final Cut Pro X 10.0.3
(Comments are closed.)

George Wedding  2012-02-01 16:22
From what I can see, the 10.0.3 Final Cut Pro update still has no support for Panasonic's extension of the AVCHD format (1080p60 .mts) files that competing applications have supported for a year or more. How can Apple be so far behind? If an editor can't see and organize such a common file type in Aperture or edit it in Final Cut Pro, how can Apple's Pro applications remain relevant? Premier supports this format. Sony Vegas suppprts this format. Why not Final Cut Pro?
Aaron Goy  2012-02-08 05:06
I can't be certain but I think that Final Cut Pro supports this via import via Camera/ Camera Archive. I have dabbled with projects requiring mts files before in fcpx.
Curtis Wilcox  An apple icon for a Friend of TidBITS 2012-02-10 13:39
Aaron's right, both FCP7 and FCPX can import Panasonic's AVCHD video. You can't just drop the .mts files on them, it wants the full folder hierarchy from the SD card which include additional files containing additional metadata.

I don't recall which ones but FCP is not alone is this requirement for this format.