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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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Hazel 3.0.4

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Noodlesoft continues to refine its file cleanup utility with Hazel 3.0.4 after its recent update to version 3.0 (see “Hazel 3.0.1,” 4 March 2012). This release modifies a number of user interface behaviors, including the capability to click on tokens to add them when editing patterns and display of a pause icon for paused folders in the Run Rules submenu. It fixes a problem where a deleted custom token wasn’t deleted from patterns using it and a bug where multiple custom tokens were created with the same name. The update also fixes incorrect formatting of custom tokens with numbers, prevents Growl messages from converting slashes to colons, prevents a crash when opening rules that used the old keywords attribute, and fixes a bug using the copy action with the Throw Away Duplicate Files option set. ($25 new, $10 upgrade, 5.0 MB, release notes)

 

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