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Springy Dock Tricks

If you drag a file and hover over Dock icons, various useful things happen which are similar to Finder springing. If it's a window, the window un-minimizes from the Dock. If it's a stack, the corresponding folder in the Finder opens. If it's the Finder, it brings the Finder to the foreground and opens a window if one doesn't exist already. But the coolest (and most hidden) springing trick is if you hover over an application and press the Space bar, the application comes to the foreground. This is great for things like grabbing a file from somewhere to drop into a Mail composition window that's otherwise hidden. Grab the file you want, hover over the Mail icon, press the Space bar, and Mail comes to the front for you to drop the file into the compose window. Be sure that Spring-Loaded Folders and Windows is enabled in the Finder Preferences window.

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Bugshot Brings iOS 7-Style Image Annotation to the iPhone and iPad

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Developer Marco Arment, creator of Instapaper and The Magazine, has released a new $0.99 iOS app called Bugshot. It’s designed to help users report visual issues, like bugs, typos, and design problems. Even if you don’t need those capabilities often, you may be interested in it for its visual look alone.

Arment designed Bugshot to mimic the design language used in iOS 7, even if you use iOS 6. As such, it lacks visual chrome, relying instead on thin orange lines on a white background. Even the share button emulates the one used in iOS 7.

Bugshot couldn’t be simpler. When you launch the app, it asks to access your Camera Roll. It then displays all the images that it determines are screenshots, so you don’t have to filter through every image in your camera roll.

Once you pick an image, you can annotate it with either an orange arrow or box. Click the appropriate button at the top of the screen and draw with your finger. The longer the arrow you draw, the larger it grows. Unfortunately, there’s no text annotation. However, as of the Bugshot 1.1 update, released 22 July 2013, the app also features a Blur tool to pixelate private information.

If you need to resize one of your arrows or boxes, just pinch it with two fingers. If you need to delete one, double-tap it.

Once you’ve annotated your image, click the share button to send the image to Mail, Twitter, Facebook, the Camera Roll, or a printer, or just copy the image. As of the 1.1 update, you can also open your Bugshot drawings in any other app that supports images.

Bugshot won’t change the world, but it’s a fun and useful visual communication tool. And if you’ve been dying to get a feel for iOS 7’s interface without becoming a developer or potentially bricking a device, Bugshot is a cheap way to do so.


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Comments about Bugshot Brings iOS 7-Style Image Annotation to the iPhone and iPad
(Comments are closed.)

Peter Worsley  2013-07-23 16:58
Evernote Skitch allows more options and is just as easy to use.
Josh Centers  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2013-07-23 19:09
I love Evernote, but Skitch has been a mess since they took it over. It's slow and the interface is cumbersome.
Josh Centers  2015-05-28 16:12
Marco discontinued Bugshot, but he gave the app to the folks at Lickability, who turned it into Pinpoint.