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Open Files with Finder's App Switcher

Say you're in the Finder looking at a file and you want to open it with an application that's already running but which doesn't own that particular document. How? Switch to that app and choose File > Open? Too many steps. Choose Open With from the file's contextual menu? Takes too long, and the app might not be listed. Drag the file to the Dock and drop it onto the app's icon? The icon might be hard to find; worse, you might miss.

In Leopard there's a new solution: use the Command-Tab switcher. Yes, the Command-Tab switcher accepts drag-and-drop! The gesture required is a bit tricky. Start dragging the file in the Finder: move the file, but don't let up on the mouse button. With your other hand, press Command-Tab to summon the switcher, and don't let up on the Command key. Drag the file onto the application's icon in the switcher and let go of the mouse. (Now you can let go of the Command key too.) Extra tip: If you switch to the app beforehand, its icon in the Command-Tab switcher will be easy to find; it will be first (or second).

Visit Take Control of Customizing Leopard

 

 

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BusyCal 2.5.1

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After adding support for Microsoft Exchange in its last release (see “BusyCal 2.5,” 19 August 2013), BusyMac has tidied up a few things with the release of BusyCal 2.5.1. The update fixes issues with time zones when syncing with Exchange, as well as various unspecified “edge-case” bugs related to Exchange. It also fixes crashes involving the Availability Panel, random calendar color changes when syncing with iCloud, and HTTP 400 errors when syncing with CalDAV Server. BusyCal 2.5 is available as a free 30-day trial from the BusyMac Web site, but the only way to purchase the app is through the Mac App Store. ($29.99 new, free update, 9.9 MB, release notes)

Check out the Take Control ebooks that expand on the topic in this article:

Download this free ebook by Joe Kissell to learn how calendar servers and clients work, when to use iCloud or Google Calendar for syncing and sharing, and how to construct a sensible calendar strategy for BusyCal 2 on your Mac, even if you or others also use other calendar apps. Thanks to BusyMac for sponsoring this ebook!

 

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