Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Pick an apple! 
 
Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Security Update 2013-004 for Lion and Snow Leopard

Send Article to a Friend

Apple has released Security Update 2013-004 for Mac OS X 10.7 Lion and 10.6 Snow Leopard, both of which receive two versions: Lion (113.23 MB) and Lion Server (161.17 MB), plus Snow Leopard (331.5 MB) and Snow Leopard Server (406.49 MB).

Most notably, the updates fix an issue in Lion where an attacker could gain superuser access by resetting the system clock. (For details, see “Hackers Can Root Macs by Going Back in Time,” 30 August 2013.)

Additionally, these updates fix other user-level vulnerabilities in Lion, including security holes in QuickTime that could permit malicious movie files to cause application crashes or arbitrary code execution, Installer packages that could be opened after certificate revocation, and an issue in Mobile Device Management that could disclose passwords to local users.

Also fixed are a number of security vulnerabilities on the Unix end, via updates to the Apache Web server, the BIND DNS server (Lion only), the ClamAV virus scanner, the IPSec security package, the PHP scripting language, and the PostgreSQL database (Lion only). (Free, various sizes)

 

CrashPlan is easy, secure backup that works everywhere. Back up
to your own drives, friends, and online with unlimited storage.
With 30 days free, backing up is one resolution you can keep.
Your life is digital; back it up! <http://tid.bl.it/code42-tb>
 

Comments about Security Update 2013-004 for Lion and Snow Leopard

Jim Topanga  2013-09-30 13:36
I cannot successfully download Security Update 2013-4 on my MacBook 10.6.8 (SnowLeopard). After 2 hours of downloading, seemingly 100%, I receive the message, [The update “Security Update 2013-004” can’t be saved]. Three times this happened. Right now I'm downloading "SecUpd2013-004.dmg" which is 113MB.
Adam Engst  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2013-09-30 14:13
You might run Disk Utility and check for drive corruption, just in case.
Toadattoadhall  2013-10-27 12:33
I run t iMacs with Snow Leopard. I updated the software on one and restarted the computer as required. From that moment on I was unable to log on. I had to do a full system reinstall as I was unable to do anything including using safe mode.
I was advised by Apple NOT to run security updates on my other Mac for a couple of months as this was one of many issues with the security fix