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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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Terrified by what your cellular bill might look like if you travel internationally? It doesn’t have to be that way, as David Pogue writes at the New York Times, thanks to a new policy by T-Mobile. Starting in November 2013, international data and texts will be free for T-Mobile customers (with an optional paid Speed Boost package for faster data), and calls cost 20 cents per minute nearly anywhere in the world. Alas, T-Mobile’s coverage isn’t sufficient for many people, but if the coverage is good where you live, it would be refreshing to work with a carrier that isn’t hell-bent on gouging customers.favicon follow link