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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Chapter 11 of “Take Control of Apple TV” Available

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With Chapter 11, “Do More with Apple TV,” we’re bringing the streamed chapters of “Take Control of Apple TV” to a close. But while this chapter may be the last, it’s far from the least. That’s because Josh Centers uses it to tell you about some things that enable you to do more with your Apple TV than Apple intends.

In particular, Josh explains how to set up the Plex media management system, which can play videos in more formats than iTunes supports, gives you more flexible storage options, provides automatic metadata management, and lets you watch video from sources not currently supported by the Apple TV (including Comedy Central). He also provides instructions for setting up Elgato’s EyeTV HD, which connects to your Mac and records live TV from your cable, satellite, or antenna connection, saving the files into iTunes for showing on the Apple TV. And for those hobbled by DNS-based region restrictions, he offers some pointers on how to make it seem like you’re somewhere else. If you’re a TidBITS member, enjoy reading!

As I said, this is the last chapter, so here is the full list of streamed chapters in “Take Control of Apple TV” if you’ve missed any during our weekly release schedule. If you have questions or comments on any of these chapters, particularly this final one, please ask them soon, since we’re taking our final editing pass on the manuscript this week and will be moving into final production shortly thereafter. Big thanks to everyone whose comments and questions have helped shape the book so far.

Once we’re done, “Take Control of Apple TV” will be available in PDF, EPUB, and Mobipocket (Kindle) formats for everyone, and TidBITS members who would like to keep it around in an ebook package rather than come back to it on the TidBITS Web site can save 30 percent on it (and all other Take Control titles).

We’ve been happy with how streaming “Take Control of Apple TV” and Jeff Carlson’s “Take Control of Your Digital Photos on a Mac” has worked out (see “Streamed Advice for Managing Your Digital Photos,” 1 July 2013), since it gives us a regular schedule to hit each week, lets us receive early feedback, and provides TidBITS members with a way to read in bite-sized pieces, without having to commit to a full book. We’ll be looking for more titles that will fit well with this streaming approach later in the year — if you have any suggestions, let us know! Thanks again for the support — it means a lot to us.

 

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Special thanks to Paul R. Duffly, Jerry, Joe Schnide, and William Kish
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Comments about Chapter 11 of “Take Control of Apple TV” Available
(Comments are closed.)

Michael Paine  2014-01-28 19:31
"He also provides instructions for setting up Elgato’s EyeTV HD, which connects to your Mac and records live TV from your cable, satellite, or antenna connection, saving the files into iTunes for showing on the Apple TV."

That is useful for watching recorded shows on the AppleTV.

It would be extremely useful if EyeTV could stream live digital TV directly to the AppleTV. Currently it does not support Airplay and it seems unlikely that it will get this feature (Elgato R & D seems to be woeful). I have tried Airparrot but the digital audio is way out of sync.
Adam Engst  An apple icon for a TidBITS Staffer 2014-01-29 07:20
Yes, being able to stream live TV via AirPlay would be cool.