Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

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Open Files with Finder's App Switcher

Say you're in the Finder looking at a file and you want to open it with an application that's already running but which doesn't own that particular document. How? Switch to that app and choose File > Open? Too many steps. Choose Open With from the file's contextual menu? Takes too long, and the app might not be listed. Drag the file to the Dock and drop it onto the app's icon? The icon might be hard to find; worse, you might miss.

In Leopard there's a new solution: use the Command-Tab switcher. Yes, the Command-Tab switcher accepts drag-and-drop! The gesture required is a bit tricky. Start dragging the file in the Finder: move the file, but don't let up on the mouse button. With your other hand, press Command-Tab to summon the switcher, and don't let up on the Command key. Drag the file onto the application's icon in the switcher and let go of the mouse. (Now you can let go of the Command key too.) Extra tip: If you switch to the app beforehand, its icon in the Command-Tab switcher will be easy to find; it will be first (or second).

Visit Take Control of Customizing Leopard

 
 

Take Control of OS X Server, Chapter 3: Preparation and Installation

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This article is a pre-release chapter in the upcoming “Take Control of OS X Server,” by Charles Edge, scheduled for public release later in 2014. Apart from Chapter 1: Introducing OS X Server, and Chapter 2: Choosing Server Hardware, these chapters are available only to TidBITS members; see “Take Control of OS X Server” Streaming in TidBITS for details.


Preparation and Installation

Now that you have your server hardware, it’s time to install OS X Server. Don’t worry, though—there’s no reason to be intimidated by OS X Server, largely because it’s just an app, albeit one that installs and manages other apps that provide content to other computers. Plus, I’ll guide you through the entire process.

Note: A particular app that provides a specific type of content to other computers is called a service. Each of the subsequent chapters in the book focuses on a specific service (or two if related).

There are a few places where my instructions may seem more complicated than necessary. That’s because I’ve learned over the years that the simplest approach can lead to significant trouble later on. It’s better to put extra effort in at the start when that can prevent later problems.

The rest of this 5,320-word article is currently restricted to paid TidBITS members. If you’d like to support our work and become a paid member, it's an easy process and we'll throw in some additional perks.

If you are a paid TidBITS member, you can read the rest of this article by logging into your account. Clicking My Account > Login at the left. Contact us if you have problems.

 

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