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Opening a Folder from the Dock

Sick of the dock on Mac OS X Leopard not being able to open folders with a simple click, like sanity demands and like it used to be in Tiger? You can, of course click it, and then click again on Open in Finder, but that's twice as many clicks as it used to be. (And while you're at it, Control-click the folder, and choose both Display as Folder and View Content as List from the contextual menu. Once you have the content displaying as a list, there's an Open command right there, but that requires Control-clicking and choosing a menu item.) The closest you can get to opening a docked folder with a single click is Command-click, which opens its enclosing folder. However, if you instead put a file from the docked folder in the Dock, and Command-click that file, you'll see the folder you want. Of course, if you forget to press Command when clicking, you'll open the file, which may be even more annoying.

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Take Control of OS X Server, Chapter 4: Directory Services

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This article is a pre-release chapter in the upcoming “Take Control of OS X Server,” by Charles Edge, scheduled for public release later in 2014. Apart from Chapter 1: Introducing OS X Server, and Chapter 2: Choosing Server Hardware, these chapters are available only to TidBITS members; see “Take Control of OS X Server” Streaming in TidBITS for details.


Directory Services

A directory service is a shared repository of usernames, passwords, network resources, and other information. Mac network clients (and by “client,” I mean a computer) use a directory service to look up various things.

For the typical reader of this book, a directory service is where you’ll create and store user accounts for services including file sharing, calendar, and contacts.

The directory service is at the heart of many large networks. But a directory service is really just a database that lives on a server, along with some underlying technologies that Apple collectively refers to as Open Directory. Some directory services can have roles that are broken out amongst a number of servers, but for the purposes of this book, I’ll assume you need only one directory server (or at most two) to keep this chapter from expanding into a book of its own.

The rest of this 5,768-word article is currently restricted to paid TidBITS members. If you’d like to support our work and become a paid member, it's an easy process and we'll throw in some additional perks.

If you are a paid TidBITS member, you can read the rest of this article by logging into your account. Clicking My Account > Login at the left. Contact us if you have problems.

 

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