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Open Files with Finder's App Switcher

Say you're in the Finder looking at a file and you want to open it with an application that's already running but which doesn't own that particular document. How? Switch to that app and choose File > Open? Too many steps. Choose Open With from the file's contextual menu? Takes too long, and the app might not be listed. Drag the file to the Dock and drop it onto the app's icon? The icon might be hard to find; worse, you might miss.

In Leopard there's a new solution: use the Command-Tab switcher. Yes, the Command-Tab switcher accepts drag-and-drop! The gesture required is a bit tricky. Start dragging the file in the Finder: move the file, but don't let up on the mouse button. With your other hand, press Command-Tab to summon the switcher, and don't let up on the Command key. Drag the file onto the application's icon in the switcher and let go of the mouse. (Now you can let go of the Command key too.) Extra tip: If you switch to the app beforehand, its icon in the Command-Tab switcher will be easy to find; it will be first (or second).

Visit Take Control of Customizing Leopard

 

 

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Apple Introduces $49 Mac Pro Security Lock

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If you purchased the new, 2013-era Mac Pro, you might have been dumbfounded to discover that the tiny, yet expensive, desktop machine did not feature a standard security slot to prevent a ne’er-do-well from taking it off your desk.

Now Apple has introduced a solution: a $49 clamp-on Kensington lock adapter, which is compatible with most computer security locks and also prevents your Mac Pro from being opened. Unfortunately, for $49, you get only the bracket, not a lock to go with it, which will set you back another five to thirty dollars.

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Given that the Mac Pro starts at $2,999, it’s a bit infuriating that Apple is charging another $49 for what should be a standard feature. On the other hand, $49 isn’t much to add a slight bit of protection to such an expensive piece of hardware (Still mulling over the cost of a Mac Pro? See Julio Ojeda-Zapata’s “Can a Normal User Justify a Mac Pro?,” 21 April 2014).

Hopefully Apple will offer a similar solution for the MacBook Air and the newer MacBook Pro with Retina Display, neither of which features a security slot.

 

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Comments about Apple Introduces $49 Mac Pro Security Lock
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Arthur Sauer  An apple icon for a TidBITS Contributor 2014-07-03 14:03
After a long search I found this for the MacBook Pro Retina: http://www.noblelocks.com/PLST.html
I do not understand what goes on in the minds of people that decide that this "feature" is completely useless. I use computers in theaters... I need a lock, or I have to walk around with my laptops all day...
B. Jefferson Le Blanc  2014-07-07 19:08
Considering the cost of a Mac Pro Apple should include this locking device as a standard feature on the computer. After all, it was they who designed the Mac Pro so that it needs an ancillary device to connect to a lock. In effect, they created a problem so that they could charge for the solution. That's not innovation. It's exploitation - and their customers are the chumps being exploited.