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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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O Pioneer!

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O Pioneer! -- Japan-based Pioneer Electronics Corporation announced last week that it has reached an agreement with Apple to license the Mac OS for use in Pioneer's first entries into the personal computer market. Pioneer, well-known for its home electronics products, plans to produce multimedia computers directly for the home entertainment market, featuring a high degree of integration with new and existing Pioneer technologies. Pioneer certainly has a lot to build upon the home electronics arena, but one wonders if Pioneer is up to the sort of technical support, quality assurance, and evangelism necessary in the computer industry. Pricing information hasn't been announced and it's unclear if Pioneer intends to introduce these products outside of Japan.

Pioneer plans units based on the 66 MHz PowerPC 601 and the 33 MHz 68LC040, each with 4.4x CD-ROM drives and multisync monitors. Pioneer promises to bundle original software with its units to "provide a new world of A/V computing" and provide easy capture and manipulation of audio and video data. Prototypes will be demonstrated this week at the Macworld Expo to held in Chiba, Japan. [GD]

 

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