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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

VAMP After Dark Contest

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VAMP (Vereniging Actieve Mac Programmeurs - Association for Active Mac Programmers), a Dutch non-profit association, is organizing a programming competition for After Dark module programers.

Unlike similar contests sponsored by After Dark developer Berkeley

-- Systems, VAMP will choose a winner based solely on programming creativity and skill, rather than visual aesthetics. Perhaps the best comparison would be with the annual MacHack contest for best hack.

Entries must consist of a completed After Dark module accompanied with full source code that runs with After Dark 2.0w or later, on a Macintosh using System 6.0.7 or later.

VAMP must receive entries before 31-Dec-93, and judging should be complete by April of 1994. Prizes consist of $500 for the overall winner and $250 for the runner-up, along with the "Symantec Special Prize" (the winner's choice of a Symantec Macintosh Development Environment). Entries will also be submitted to Berkeley Systems for publication, which may result in additional prize money.

For more information via automatic reply, please send email to:

info@fourc.nl
-- Information from:
John W. Sinteur -- sinteur@fourc.nl

 

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