Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Pick an apple! 
 
Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Connectix Does It Again

Send Article to a Friend

Connectix seems to continually fix something in the Macintosh system software that Apple should have done right in the first place. Virtual was the first (see TidBITS-160 for details of the latest version), and Connectix has filled Apple's potholes with MODE32 and CPU as well. Late last month, Connectix did it again, releasing a patch for a bug in Apple's System Enabler files that come with System 7.1.

According to Connectix, the System Enabler files released along with the new Macintosh models last October, which allow these Macs to work with System 7.1, contain a bug that can potentially cause a system error. Affected machines include the PowerBook 160 and 180, PowerBook Duo 210 and 230, Macintosh IIvx and IIvi, and, we assume, the Performa 600.

Connectix says the bug has caused problems for users of AppleTalk version 58 and Suitcase 2.1 under System 7.1. Specifically, any software making a "GetIndResource" system call with an index out of bounds will cause two low memory globals to be set incorrectly. This could cause a crash at a later time.

Apple engineers have verified the bug and have said that Connectix's patch appears to produce the desired results with no side effects. Apple has fixed the problem within their System Enablers, but corrected versions will not be available immediately. Most likely they will be distributed with the next release of the System software, so users should be able to discard the Connectix patch when they update to any version later than 7.1 of the System software.

Connectix suggests that all users of 7.1 whose Macs require these System Enablers should use the Enabler Patch. It will do nothing if the buggy software is not present, or if a bug fix is already provided via a newer System version.

The patch should be available from most popular online services and Internet FTP archives by the time you read this, and may be distributed free of charge as long as the Read Me document is kept with the software. Publishers interested in including the patch with commercial products should contact Connectix first.

Connectix -- 800/950-5880 -- 415/571-5100

Information from:
Connectix propaganda -- connectix.ts@applelink.apple.com
Matthew Strange -- Matthew_Strange@baka.ithaca.ny.us

 

Make friends and influence people by sponsoring TidBITS!
Put your company and products in front of tens of thousands of
savvy, committed Apple users who actually buy stuff.
More information: <http://tidbits.com/advertising.html>