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Record Online Meetings in Pear Note

While Pear Note is primarily geared toward recording notes in the physical world, it's possible to use it to record things in the virtual world as well. For instance, you can use it to record and take notes on Skype calls. To do this:

  1. Download Soundflower and install it (along with the Soundflowerbed app that comes with it).
  2. Download LineIn and install it.
  3. Start Soundflowerbed, and select Built-in Output (or whatever output you'd like to listen to the conversation on).
  4. Start LineIn, and select your microphone (e.g. Built-in Mic) as the input and Soundflower (2ch) as the output, then press Pass Thru.
  5. Open Pear Note Preferences, select Recording, and select Soundflower (2ch) as the audio device.
  6. Open Skype Preferences, select Audio, and select Soundflower (2ch) as the audio output and your microphone (e.g. Built-in Mic) as the audio input.
  7. Hit record in Pear Note and make your Skype call.

This will allow you to conduct your Skype call while Pear Note records both your audio and the other participant's.

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Sounding Off

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Craig O'Donnell passes on some notes on Macintosh audio as of Macworld Expo in San Francisco:

  • I verified that the IIvx, Performa 600, and Duo 210/230 do NOT reproduce the right channel of a stereo sound file, for example, a stereo System Beep or a stereo QuickTime soundtrack. Apple's engineers did not know why this might be, but promised to track things down.

  • I also verified that the AppleCD 300 can send audio tracks (from your favorite Elton John CD, for example) down the SCSI bus as a 16-bit audio data stream. However, Apple engineers had no idea of applications for the firmware capabilities. (Essentially there are two problems: first, stereo audio is 10 MB per stereo minute which makes for large disk files; and second, the data would have to be sucked into an application or utility and made into a file, like an AIFF file, before it could be used for much of anything). This may, however, presage some sort of CD-ROM to DSP sound chip capability in future Macintoshes.

Information from:
Craig O'Donnell -- 72511.240@compuserve.com

 

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