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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Apple & AOL

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Apple and America Online (AOL) recently announced an agreement in which Apple will use AOL technologies in future online services managed and marketed by Apple. America Online also granted Apple a non-exclusive license to use America Online to provide "Apple-branded" (git 'em up, little doggies!) online services in exchange for a usage royalty.

This is interesting in that in some form, America Online's technologies originated with Apple, which planned to use it for an "AppleLink Lite" or some such monstrously-named service. Apple has subsequently flirted with SoftArc's excellent FirstClass BBS software as well, but I wonder if this means that Apple has decided to go back to the AOL platform. Perhaps Apple is tiring slightly with AppleLink or enough people have complained about the high costs? Who knows? I just wish AOL would significantly revamp their messaging interface, add off-line capabilities past the basic email and downloads, and increase the limitation on incoming email from the Internet gateway past the thoroughly absurd 25K.

 

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