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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Walnut Creek Fiasco

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Walnut Creek Fiasco -- Dale Baker writes:

I thought I'd mention that Walnut Creek CD-ROM does not even own a Macintosh and when I spoke to the tech support guy he said "I wish we didn't even sell Mac CD-ROMs." This was after I immediately called about the Garbo CD-ROM (as mentioned in TidBITS-148).

Walnut Creek could not tell me why I was unable to see any files in the window to access the disc. Eventually I found that if I went through a file dialog box that I could find the programs; however I still had to convert from MacBinary and decompress the files.

I wasn't impressed (to say the least) and am waiting for my copy of the Info-Mac CD. I expect it to be better due to the fact that Mac users created it for a Mac, on a Mac. Thank the gods for HFS CD-ROMs!

I would steer Mac users clear of Walnut Creek until there has been a clear statement that they support Macintosh and own at least one Mac on which they test their product before selling it.

Information from:
Dale Baker -- BAKER1326@iscsvax.uni.edu

 

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