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Delete All Comments in Word in a Flash

You needn't clear comments in a Word document one by one. Instead, bring out the big guns to delete all of them at once:

1. Chose Tools > Keyboard Shortcuts.

2. Under Categories, select Tools.

3. Under Commands, select DeleteAllCommentsInDoc.

4. With the insertion point in the "Press new keyboard shortcut" field, press keys to create a keyboard shortcut. (I use Control-7)

5. Click the Assign button.

6. Click OK.

You can now press your keyboard shortcut to zap out the comments.

The steps above work in Word 2008; they likely work nearly as described in older versions of Word.

 
 

Tune-Up Details

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Well, the details about the System 7 Tune-Up keep dribbling in. If you don't have difficulties, don't worry, just keep this information in mind in case you need it.

Important!! -- Greg Marriott of Apple set us straight on our speculation about how Tune-Up works. We implied that after you install Tune-Up 1.1.1, you are protected from the disappearing files bug even if you boot without the Tune-Up 1.1.1 extension present. This was based on observations that the Tune-Up installer adds code to the System file when it installs the Tuner extension, and that Apple said that users are protected even if they boot with the Shift key held down in order to disable extensions.

This speculation turns out to be wrong, because the code installed in the System file by the Tune-Up installer merely knows to load the actual bug fix code from the Tuner extension. The code in the System file does NOT fix the bug itself, so if you throw out the Tuner extension the bug fix code WILL NOT LOAD. So do not throw out or move that Tuner extension, or you may fall victim to the disappearing files bug.

Information from:
Greg Marriott -- Apple Computer

Extra INIT ID 11 -- The Tune-Up 1.1 installer puts INIT ID 11 in your System file, and when you install Tune-Up 1.1.1, INIT ID 11 remains in your System file and INIT ID 13 is added.

Last issue we suggested that if you have problems after installing Tune-Up 1.1.1 that you remove INIT ID 11 from your System file. Since then, several knowledgable people told us that the duplication should not be responsible for any crashes and is in fact identical to the INIT ID 13, but Ron Southerland wrote to tell us that after he removed INIT ID 11, his Mac stopped crashing with a Finder bus error at shutdown. So we don't recommend that you blithely remove INIT ID 11, but if you have crashing problems and don't want to reinstall the System file and then reinstall Tune-Up 1.1.1, it might be worth a try. Again, work on a backup and at your own risk.

Information from:
Ron Southerland -- southerl@acs.ucalgary.ca

Laser Prep 7.1.1 -- If you use AppleShare 2.0.1's printer sharing services, and you need to upgrade to the new LaserWriter 7.1.1 driver that comes on the System 7 Tune-Up disks, it's important to realize that you'll also need Laser Prep 7.1.1 for the server.

Laser Prep 7.1.1 is not included with the System 7 Tune-Up disk or with any of the currently-shipping versions of System 7, but it is available on the disk that comes with the Personal LaserWriter NTR. It will also soon be available on AppleLink.

Information from:
Mark Hansen - Apple Computer

StyleWriter 7.2.2 -- Matt Neuburg writes:

It is now clear that Apple made a little error in the StyleWriter driver 7.2.2, the one included with all versions of the Tune-Up software. Although a StyleWriter is a 360 dpi device, the driver "informs" applications that it is a 72 dpi device (this detail comes from the engineers at Adobe, who explained it on the nets recently). Apparently this information is picked up either at print time or at application startup time; in any case the application is told even if you do not run Page Setup. As a result, graphics programs such as Adobe Illustrator, which print beautiful grayscale and splendidly smooth curves at 360 dpi under StyleWriter 7.1, now print only jagged, gross 72 dpi images. Even SuperPaint does worse than before: it prints the wrong patterns, and gradients, which used to print a rather ugly 72 dpi version and now do not print at all.

There is a workaround, which is to go back to the 7.1 driver. You can keep a copy of this in the Extensions folder along with the 7.2.2 version [which is still useful for its much faster printing speed -Adam], provided it has another name: say, Old StyleWriter. The Chooser allows you to switch between the two.

[Any word on fixes from a printing person at Apple? -Adam]

Information from:
Matt Neuburg -- clas005@cantva.canterbury.ac.nz

 

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