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Opening a Folder from the Dock

Sick of the dock on Mac OS X Leopard not being able to open folders with a simple click, like sanity demands and like it used to be in Tiger? You can, of course click it, and then click again on Open in Finder, but that's twice as many clicks as it used to be. (And while you're at it, Control-click the folder, and choose both Display as Folder and View Content as List from the contextual menu. Once you have the content displaying as a list, there's an Open command right there, but that requires Control-clicking and choosing a menu item.) The closest you can get to opening a docked folder with a single click is Command-click, which opens its enclosing folder. However, if you instead put a file from the docked folder in the Dock, and Command-click that file, you'll see the folder you want. Of course, if you forget to press Command when clicking, you'll open the file, which may be even more annoying.

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Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Old Monitor Makes Way

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Director of Technical Services, Baka Industries Inc.

Apple recently introduced its new Multiple Scan 17 Display, a 17" color Trinitron monitor expected to be available worldwide this month. The monitor offers numerous features and replaces the Macintosh 16" Color Display in Apple's product family. The monitor's price checks in at $1,069, and its item number is M2611LL/A.

Sporting a current-generation Sony Trinitron picture tube, the Multiple Scan 17 Display can be adjusted using digital controls, and supports three different color temperatures (5000, 6500, and 9300 degrees Kelvin) to provide accurate color display for a variety of needs. The unit supports 640 x 480, 832 x 624, and 1024 x 768 resolutions using the built-in video feature on current Macintosh and Power Macintosh models, and resolutions from 640 x 480 up to 1280 x 1024 on PC systems with appropriate circuitry or video cards.

Apple's new Display Manager software allows on-the-fly resolution switching, so users needn't shut down their computers to change display size. The 640 x 480 resolution should come in handy for desktop presentations, and will also be suitable for Macintosh users whose vision won't let them see tiny dots clearly.

The monitor is Energy Star compliant, taking advantage of recent Macs' ability to reduce electrical consumption when the computer is inactive and the monitor can be blanked or dimmed. (Many older Macs can take advantage of Apple's Energy Saver software to do this as well.) It's also compliant with Sweden's strict MPRII guidelines for low electrical and magnetic emissions, and, for good measure, supports Apple's ColorSync color matching technology. To help eliminate snarls of cables, the display has sound in/out ports and ADB Apple Desktop Bus (ADB) ports for keyboards and mice.

The Multiple Scan 17 Display works right out of the box with the Power Macintosh series, all Quadras and Centrises, the Macintosh Display Card 24AC, and IBM-PC compatible computers. Apple says it can be used with other Macintosh computers (including various Mac II models, PowerBooks, and Duo docks) and video cards (such as Apple's 8*24 card) using an $8.95 cable adapter from Enhance Technology. This adapter, or others like it, should also be available from many dealers.

Some Apple dealers may discount remaining 16" displays (item number M1044Z/A), so if you're happy with a single 832 x 624 resolution, take a look.

Enhance Technology -- 800/343-2425 -- 408/293-2425
408/293-2468 (fax)
Information from:
Apple propaganda
Enhance Technology

 

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