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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse


About Those 56 Kbps Modems

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About Those 56 Kbps Modems -- If you're thinking about blazing through the Internet with a 56 Kbps modem, you might want to check out NetBITS-008, which features an article looking at how 56K modems work and why the competing K56Flex and X2 standards may be burning users. The issue also talks about image compression methods, laments the passing of Gopher and WAIS, and catches a wave with the originator of the phrase "surfing the Internet." Also, if you have questions about Web graphics, you may find answers in NetBITS-007, where Glenn Fleishman explains GIF, JPEG, PNG, and more. That issue also talks about email bounces and debunks the current misinformation being spread about America Online. If you find these NetBITS articles useful, you can receive NetBITS in email each week automatically by sending email to <>. [ACE]

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