Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Pick an apple! 
 
Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Question: Blast from the Past?

Send Article to a Friend

Question: Blast from the Past? Since we're on the subject of time on the Internet, we'd like to thank Sylvia Belgodere for subscribing to NetBITS... from 1956 (according to the date line of her email message). We had no idea that NetBITS was popular back in 1956! Is Sylvia a time traveller reading her email while on a trip to the past using a Time & Location Manager-equipped PowerBook? Or is there some other reason why her mail (and that of many others on the Internet) has a weird time?

Answer: Most, if not all email programs pick up the current date from the system clock of the computer they're on. Since it's all too easy to set a clock wrong, and since computer clocks also control the date setting, you should check the time and date setting to make sure it's correct. On a Macintosh, use the Date & Time control panel; in Windows, use the Date/Time control panel. While you're there, make sure your time zone and daylight savings time settings are correct for your location.
Although this may seem like a minor problem, remember that many email programs sort incoming messages by date. So, in my copy of Eudora Pro, for instance, if a message comes in with the year set to 1956, Eudora will sort it to the top of my In mailbox. However, since most incoming messages sort to the bottom of my In mailbox (and since I receive hundreds of messages each day), I may not even notice an incorrectly dated message for a while.
Perhaps in a future FAQtoids we'll report on how to have your computer set its clock automatically from an atomic clock when you connect to the Internet. [ACE]

 

Fujitsu ScanSnap Scanners — Save your business time and money
with our easy-to-use small ScanSnap Scanner line. Eliminate
paper piles by scanning documents, business cards, and receipts.
Visit us at: <http://www.ez.com/sstb>