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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Keep It Up More Often

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Keep It Up More Often -- Karl Pottie has released Keep It Up 1.4.1, a minor bug fix for his useful application monitoring utility. Keep It Up watches selected applications and relaunches them if they quit or crash. After a user-specified number of attempts to relaunch an application, Keep It Up can restart the Mac. Other features include the capability to open specified documents on application launch, perform scheduled restarts, and keep one application frontmost at all times. Keep It Up is $22 shareware and is a 186K download. [ACE]

<http://www.vl-brabant.be/mac/kiu.html>

 

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