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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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Open Door Slams Network Doors

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Open Door Networks has released a public beta of DoorStop, a software-based firewall for individual Macintosh servers. Unlike expensive hardware solutions, DoorStop operates only on the Macintosh on which it is installed, providing flexible blocking of TCP services. You can block any TCP connection from any address or range of addresses, block access to all TCP services on the server, block accesses to particular IP addresses on a multihomed server, and keep a log of all denied and allowed accesses. DoorStop should be of special interest to anyone running Open Door's ShareWay IP, which provides AppleShare-over-IP services to Macs running Personal File Sharing. As we commented in "Share and Share IP Alike" in TidBITS 436, ShareWay IP creates some security issues - DoorStop should significantly alleviate those concerns if installed correctly. DoorStop requires a PowerPC-based Mac, Mac OS 8.1, and Open Transport 1.3 or later. Pricing has yet to be set, and version 1.0b1, which expires 01-Oct-98, is a 680K download.

 

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