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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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California Outlaws Spam

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Joining the U.S. states of Nevada and Washington, California has now passed two bills regarding spam, both of which go into effect on 01-Jan-99. The Bowen bill requires spammers to make spam easier to identify and filter by labeling it with "ADV:" in the subject line; adult-oriented spam must use "ADV:ADLT". The bill also requires spammers to set up toll-free telephone numbers or use accurate return email addresses to enable Internet users to remove themselves from spam lists. Violators are subject to a $500 fine for every message sent and a misdemeanor offense. The bill applies to spammers in California or those sending spam to users living in California.

<http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/bill/asm/ab_1651- 1700/ab_1676_bill_980820_amended_ sen.html>

The Miller bill, aimed at protecting email providers, allows any organization that provides email and has equipment located in California to sue spammers for computer trespass and to recover losses caused by dealing with spam attacks. The bill allows for damages of $50 per message with a maximum of $15,000 per day, or actual damages, whichever amount is greater. The bill also makes it illegal "to knowingly and without permission use the Internet domain name of another individual, corporation, or entity in connection with the sending of one or more electronic mail messages and to thereby disrupt or cause the disruption of computer services."

<http://www.leginfo.ca.gov/pub/bill/asm/ab_1601- 1650/ab_1629_bill_980312_amended_ asm.html>

Neither bill is likely to eliminate spam, though the Miller bill offers some ammunition to organizations that are being exploited for spam delivery. The Bowen bill is more problematic because it in some ways legitimizes spam. It also worries some free speech advocates because of its labeling requirements. The hard part remains tracking down spammers to prosecute them; in addition to email headers, spammers also tend to forge physical addresses, phone numbers, credit card processing details, and ISP contact information. In my view, the fact that these people go to such lengths to hide indicates that even they don't believe they're engaging in legitimate business activities.

 

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