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Mysteriously Moving Margins in Word

In Microsoft Word 2008 (and older versions), if you put your cursor in a paragraph and then move a tab or indent marker in the ruler, the change applies to just that paragraph. If your markers are closely spaced, you may have trouble grabbing the right one, and inadvertently work with tabs when you want to work with indents, or vice-versa. The solution is to hover your mouse over the marker until a yellow tooltip confirms which element you're about to drag.

I recently came to appreciate the importance of waiting for those tooltips: a document mysteriously reset its margins several times while I was under deadline pressure, causing a variety of problems. After several hours of puzzlement, I had my "doh!" moment: I had been dragging a margin marker when I thought I was dragging an indent marker.

When it comes to moving markers in the Word ruler, the moral of the story is always to hover, read, and only then drag.

 

 

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Apple Revs G4s, Adds Digital Video Options

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Apple Revs G4s, Adds Digital Video Options -- Apple Computer has revised its Power Macintosh G4 offerings, expanding the more-advanced AGP architecture across the product line and adding a digital video interface. (See "Back to Class with the Power Mac G4" in TidBITS-496 for an overview of the initial G4 offerings; see "Speed Dips for Power Mac G4s" in TidBITS-502 for details of Apple's subsequent downshift in G4 processor speeds.) Apple's new G4s offer the same processor speeds (350, 400, and 450 MHz) and the same base prices (ranging $1,600 to $3,500) as their predecessors; however, the new machines all feature DVD-ROM drives by default, offer options for Airport wireless networking, and sport a new AGP-based ATI Rage 128 Pro video which provides improved graphics performance over earlier cards and adds a digital video interface to support the high-end LCD Apple Cinema Display and the just-announced Flat Panel Studio Display. The Flat Panel Studio Display is a digital 15-inch LCD screen with a maximum resolution of 1,024 by 768 pixels; Apple says it will be available before the end of the year for $1,300, while the 22-inch $4,000 Apple Cinema Display won't be available until January. Apple also announced it plans to make the AGP-based Rage 128 Pro video card with digital video output available in early 2000 to current owners of AGP Graphics G4 systems for $99; current owners of AGP Graphics G4s could then use Apple's digital LCD displays with their existing systems. [GD]

<http://www.apple.com/powermac/>
<http://db.tidbits.com/article/05546>
<http://db.tidbits.com/article/05615>
<http://www.apple.com/displays/asd15/>

 

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