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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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Poll Results: Macintosh Ownership

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Poll Results: Macintosh Ownership -- Steve Jobs's Macworld Expo 2000 keynote trumpeted Apple's impressive ownership numbers: roughly a quarter of iBook buyers and half of iMac buyers were new to the Mac. But Apple's repeat customers have traditionally been the company's ace in the hole, buying Macs even when Apple's future was murky. So we asked: "Over the years, how many Macs have you personally bought for your individual use at work or at home?" Of more than 2,300 respondents, nearly two thirds indicated they had purchased between two and five Macs over the years. Other responses fit nearly along a bell curve, with the notable exception that about 8 percent of respondents indicated they had purchased ten or more Macs for personal use over the years. These results would seem not only to reflect the loyalty of Apple's customers, but also to reinforce Apple's sales figures showing that the majority of Macintosh sales still go to existing Apple customers. Apple definitely needs to grow the size of the Macintosh market by attracting new converts to the platform, but the company has to ensure that initiatives aimed at attracting converts don't come at the expense of the more valuable long-time customers. [JLC]

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