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Viewing Wi-Fi Details in Snow Leopard

In Snow Leopard, hold down the Option key before clicking the AirPort menu. Doing so reveals additional technical details including which standards, speeds, and frequencies you're using to connect, as well as what's in use by other networks. With the Option key held down and with a network already joined, the AirPort menu reveals seven pieces of information: the PHY Mode, the MAC (Media Access Control) address, the channel and band in use, the security method that's in use, the RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indication) measurement, the transmit rate, and the MCS Index. In Leopard, some, but not all, of these details are revealed by Option-clicking the AirPort menu.

Submitted by
Doug McLean

 
 

Bare Bones Software Sponsoring TidBITS

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Bare Bones Software Sponsoring TidBITS -- We're happy to announce our latest sponsor, the well-known Bare Bones Software. For those vacationing without satellite Internet connections in Outer Mongolia for the last few years, Bare Bones is best known for BBEdit, their powerful text editor, and Mailsmith, which brings BBEdit's text-editing and searching power to email. Originally, Bare Bones aimed BBEdit squarely at the programmer market, and it's still considered the best programmer's editor by many developers. But in a bit of inspired genius, when HTML became popular, Bare Bones added support for HTML into BBEdit, turning it into the HTML editor of choice for people who care what their HTML code looks like (such as our Technical Editor, Geoff Duncan, who relies on BBEdit to tweak every tag in our database-generated pages). Even as the visual HTML editors became more powerful and popular, BBEdit's power user fans continue to swear by the program, and Macromedia even integrates BBEdit with Dreamweaver to give Web developers access to both visual and code approaches. BBEdit also supports a wide variety of other languages, even including a browser for setext, the implicit markup language we use for the email edition of TidBITS. Finally, on the human side, the Bare Bones crew, led by Rich Siegel, have long been strong boosters of the Macintosh community with their regular presence at (and support of) the MacHack developers conference, participation in mailing lists like TidBITS Talk, and now their sponsorship of TidBITS. We couldn't be happier to have Bare Bones on board. [ACE]

<http://www.barebones.com/>

 

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