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Find Text Leading from Acrobat PDF

Ever have to recreate a document from an Acrobat PDF? You can find out most everything about the text by using the Object Inspector, except the leading. Well, here's a cheesy way to figure it out. Open the PDF in Illustrator (you just need one page). Release any and all clipping masks. Draw a guide at the baseline of the first line of text, and one on the line below. Now, Option-drag the first line to make a copy, and position it exactly next to the original first line at baseline. Then put a return anywhere in the copied line. Now adjust leading of the copied lines, so that the second line of copy rests on the baseline of the second line of the original. Now you know your leading.

Or you could buy expensive software to find the leading. Your choice.

Visit Mac Production Artist Tips and Scripts

Submitted by
Greg Ledger

 

 

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Appeals Court Upholds Napster Injunction

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A three-judge panel of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals today issued a 58-page opinion in which it held that the popular peer-to-peer song-swapping service Napster must stop enabling users to access copyrighted material served by Napster users. The Appeals Court action follows an injunction against Napster originally issued 26-Jul-00 by Judge Marylin Patel, which barred Napster from "causing, assisting, facilitating, copying, or otherwise distributing all copyrighted songs or musical compositions." Two judges on the Appeals Court issued a temporary stay against that injunction almost immediately, pending arguments from both Napster and the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA), who is suing Napster for promoting piracy and copyright infringement. (See "Judge Presses Napster's Buttons" in TidBITS 541.) The Appeals Court decision permits Napster to remain operating until Judge Patel modifies her original "overbroad" injunction. However, the decision also requires Napster to prevent users from accessing content that would violate copyright and rules Napster had both actual and constructive knowledge of direct copyright infringement. Napster could be held liable for failing to monitor its system for copyright violations, as well as for contributory copyright infringement. Napster is expected to appeal the decision to the full Appeals Court, or even to the U.S. Supreme Court; the full text of the decision is available from FindLaw.com.

 

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