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Mac OS X Services in Snow Leopard

Mac OS X Services let one application supply its powers to another; for example, a Grab service helps TextEdit paste a screenshot into a document. Most users either don't know that Services exist, because they're in an obscure hierarchical menu (ApplicationName > Services), or they mostly don't use them because there are so many of them.

Snow Leopard makes it easier for the uninitiated to utilize this feature; only services appropriate to the current context appear. And in addition to the hierarchical menu, services are discoverable as custom contextual menu items - Control-click in a TextEdit document to access the Grab service, for instance.

In addition, the revamped Keyboard preference pane lets you manage services for the first time ever. You can enable and disable them, and even change their keyboard shortcuts.

Submitted by
Doug McLean

 

 

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UserLand Ships Frontier 7

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UserLand Ships Frontier 7 -- UserLand Software has released version 7 of their flagship program, Frontier. Frontier is a powerful outliner, database, and scripting environment that's frequently used for the creation of Web pages; since it's also an Internet client/server, it is often used as a Web server that creates its Web pages dynamically. Frontier includes Manila, a set of scripts that lets users create and maintain dynamic Frontier-based Web sites by means of a browser; alternatively, a Manila site can be maintained with Radio UserLand, a "light" version of Frontier lacking the Internet server features. What's new in Frontier 7? First, there are some tweaks to Manila and various bug fixes. Second, there's the advent of a Mac OS X-native (Carbon) version, including the ability to communicate with the Unix shell. Finally, Frontier now shares with Radio UserLand the capability to hook powerful scripted actions to its native outliner; for example, opening a heading of an outline to see its subheadings might cause those subheadings to be a list of files generated live over the Internet, or a list of MP3 files on your hard disk (which Frontier can then play). Frontier costs $900 per year ($100 academic); you can try Manila (and download Radio UserLand) for free. [MAN]

<http://frontier.userland.com/newIn70>
<http://manila.userland.com/>
<http://radio.userland.com/>
<http://db.tidbits.com/article/05351>
<http://db.tidbits.com/article/05679>

 

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