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Viewing Wi-Fi Details in Snow Leopard

In Snow Leopard, hold down the Option key before clicking the AirPort menu. Doing so reveals additional technical details including which standards, speeds, and frequencies you're using to connect, as well as what's in use by other networks. With the Option key held down and with a network already joined, the AirPort menu reveals seven pieces of information: the PHY Mode, the MAC (Media Access Control) address, the channel and band in use, the security method that's in use, the RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indication) measurement, the transmit rate, and the MCS Index. In Leopard, some, but not all, of these details are revealed by Option-clicking the AirPort menu.

Submitted by
Doug McLean

 
 

DAVE 3.1 Adds Mac OS X Support

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DAVE 3.1 Adds Mac OS X Support -- Thursby Software Systems announced the availability of DAVE 3.1, the newest version of the company's utility for sharing a Mac on a PC network. In addition to bidirectional file sharing between Macs and Windows-based PCs, DAVE 3.1 adds the capability for Windows users to access Mac machines and printers (both inkjet and PostScript) under Mac OS X 10.1. Under Mac OS 8.6 and later, only PostScript printers are accessible. Other features include large file and file name support under Mac OS 9 and Mac OS X 10.1, and automatic workgroup detection. DAVE 3.1 is a free update for anyone who purchased DAVE 2.5 during the 2001 calendar year; older copies and previous versions can be upgraded for $90, while a new version costs $150. [JLC]

<http://www.thursby.com/products/dave.html>

 

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