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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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Apple Posts $38 Million Profit

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Apple Posts $38 Million Profit -- Apple Computer posted a $38 million profit for its first fiscal quarter of 2002, directly in line with analysts' expectations for the company. Despite an aging product line, Apple shipped 746,000 Macs and 125,000 iPods during the quarter, and posted revenue of $1.38 billion on gross margins of 30.7 percent. Although Apple didn't break out sales at the 27 Apple retail stores around the U.S., they did say that the stores received over 800,000 visitors in December of 2001 alone. International sales accounted for 48 percent of Apple's revenues. Notably, Apple said initial orders for the newly redesigned G4 iMac were greater than expected, and they expected revenue would rise in the second fiscal quarter of the year - highly unusual for a computer maker in the current sluggish economy. [GD]

<http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2002/jan/ 16results.html>
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