Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Pick an apple! 
 
Viewing Wi-Fi Details in Snow Leopard

In Snow Leopard, hold down the Option key before clicking the AirPort menu. Doing so reveals additional technical details including which standards, speeds, and frequencies you're using to connect, as well as what's in use by other networks. With the Option key held down and with a network already joined, the AirPort menu reveals seven pieces of information: the PHY Mode, the MAC (Media Access Control) address, the channel and band in use, the security method that's in use, the RSSI (Received Signal Strength Indication) measurement, the transmit rate, and the MCS Index. In Leopard, some, but not all, of these details are revealed by Option-clicking the AirPort menu.

Submitted by
Doug McLean

 
 

WPA Weakness Discovered, but Easily Solved

Send Article to a Friend

WPA Weakness Discovered, but Easily Solved -- Following last week's article about the implementation of WPA (Wi-Fi Protected Access) in AirPort Extreme cards and base stations (see "AirPort 3.2 Update Adds New Security Options" in TidBITS-704), a security expert alerted me to a weakness in choosing keys for the WPA system. The weakness applies to the AirPort 3.2 update as well as to all other consumer WPA-enabled Wi-Fi systems. Basically, choosing a key comprised entirely of real words that are 20 characters or fewer leaves you open to that key being broken rather easily. The solution? Choose a longer key or invent 20 characters of gibberish. If you're particularly security-conscious, use the option Apple provides to enter 256 bits of encryption, which is 32 hexadecimal bytes or 64 hexadecimal digits! That's overkill, however. In last week's article, it wasn't clear why Apple even offers the hexadecimal option when other devices from Buffalo and Linksys don't; now it appears that Apple provides all of the options for entering WPA keys, where the other manufacturers don't. I've written more about this issue and posted my colleague's paper on the subject at Wi-Fi Networking News. [GF]

<http://wifinetnews.com/archives/002453.html>

 

Make friends and influence people by sponsoring TidBITS!
Put your company and products in front of tens of thousands of
savvy, committed Apple users who actually buy stuff.
More information: <http://tidbits.com/advertising.html>