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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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The New Face of FaceSpan

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The New Face of FaceSpan -- After a long hiatus, FaceSpan has returned in a new version completely rewritten for Mac OS X. FaceSpan 4.0 is an application construction kit with AppleScript as the programming language: you "draw" your interface, you write AppleScript code in scripts attached to the interface items, you compile, and presto, you've got a stand-alone application. Like Apple's AppleScript Studio, FaceSpan is written in Cocoa, it builds Cocoa applications, it can call Cocoa (Objective-C) methods, and it uses the AppleScriptKit dictionary.

<http://www.facespan.com/facespan/pagespeed/url/ features4.0/>
<http://www.apple.com/applescript/studio/>

Of course, AppleScript Studio has the advantage of being free (see "AppleScript's Studly Studio" in TidBITS-610). But FaceSpan is small (less than 8 MB), self-contained, and easy to use - so easy that I wrote my first application without even reading the manual. (Okay, so all it did was add two numbers together, but that's a start.) One reason for its simplicity is that the interface is remarkably intuitive; another is that a script can be attached to an individual control, and stands in an inheritance relationship with the container of that control - for example, a button in a window has a script that can "see" the window's script, similar to HyperCard. Optionally, FaceSpan also integrates with Late Night Software's Script Debugger 3.0.8 for much better debugging than Apple provides. FaceSpan comes in two versions: the full version is $200; the "lite" version is $90, and limits any compiled applications to running on a computer where FaceSpan is installed. Owners of previous versions can upgrade for $100. [MAN]

<http://db.tidbits.com/article/06667>
<http://www.latenightsw.com/sd3.0/ updateDownload.html>

 

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