Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

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Opening a Folder from the Dock

Sick of the dock on Mac OS X Leopard not being able to open folders with a simple click, like sanity demands and like it used to be in Tiger? You can, of course click it, and then click again on Open in Finder, but that's twice as many clicks as it used to be. (And while you're at it, Control-click the folder, and choose both Display as Folder and View Content as List from the contextual menu. Once you have the content displaying as a list, there's an Open command right there, but that requires Control-clicking and choosing a menu item.) The closest you can get to opening a docked folder with a single click is Command-click, which opens its enclosing folder. However, if you instead put a file from the docked folder in the Dock, and Command-click that file, you'll see the folder you want. Of course, if you forget to press Command when clicking, you'll open the file, which may be even more annoying.

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Ergonis's KeyCue Offers Keyboard Shortcut Cheat Sheet

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Ergonis's KeyCue Offers Keyboard Shortcut Cheat Sheet -- KeyCue is a simple but ingenious Mac OS X application from Ergonis Software, makers of the invaluable PopChar X (see "Panther-Prepared PopChar Published" in TidBITS-699). Taking advantage of Panther's Accessibility API (which I described in "Scripting the Unscriptable in Mac OS X" in TidBITS-670), KeyCue reads through the menu items of the frontmost application, finds those that have keyboard shortcuts, and displays a window listing them when you hold down the Command key for a few seconds. A serious shortcoming of the menu paradigm, after all, is that it requires you to open each menu one at a time to hunt for a shortcut or menu item, with the result that you never get a conspectus of an application's shortcuts, and you probably never bother to memorize most of them because, having found the menu item you want, you then just choose it with the mouse. Using KeyCue for a little while, I find, quickly helps me remember the shortcuts for the menu items I use most often; and of course it also gives me a fast way, without hunting in the menus, to access the shortcuts I don't memorize and use less often. KeyCue isn't yet quite the utility I was hoping for; what I really want is a cheat sheet that lets me see and choose from all of an application's menu items, whether or not they have shortcuts, and I'd also like a cheat sheet showing all the global "hot keys" that various applications have installed. But it's certainly a big help, and the $15 pricing is reasonable. You can download a demo version (659K) to try for yourself; it shows all available shortcuts only for the first 10 invocations, after which it hides some of the shortcuts. [MAN]

<http://www.ergonis.com/products/keycue/>
<http://www.ergonis.com/products/popcharx/>
<http://db.tidbits.com/article/07372>
<http://db.tidbits.com/article/07102>

 

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