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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 

 

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DealBITS Drawing: Dejal Simon

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One of the stresses associated with running your own Internet servers is, frankly, knowing if they're running. Most people host public servers elsewhere, to take advantage of the massive bandwidth, secure facilities, earthquake-proof racks, and tech support of companies like digital.forest. But remote hosting means you can't just look in on your server to see how it's doing, and that's where server monitoring software like Simon from Dejal Systems comes in. It can pretend to be a normal Web browser or email client or whatever, all for the purpose of connecting to your server on a regular basis and verifying not just that the machine is running, but that your server software is doing what it's supposed to do. I've been using Simon 2 for some time now to keep track of various Internet services on my Web Crossing server, and it's been quite helpful in alerting me to problems ranging from local connectivity outages to severe slowdowns related to some particularly annoying mail loops. I could have had Simon send me email, or play sounds, or various other alerts, but I opted for it bouncing its Dock icon, which is obvious while I'm at the machine and won't wake me up at night. Overall, I've appreciated not feeling as though I should be manually checking in on my Internet services all the time.

<http://www.dejal.com/simon/?ref=tb>
<http://db.tidbits.com/article/08195>

In this week's DealBITS drawing, you can enter to win one of three copies of Simon Standard (which supports up to 20 tests), worth $59.95. Entrants who aren't among our lucky winners will receive a discount on all versions of Simon, so if you need to keep a closer eye on your servers, be sure to enter at the DealBITS page linked below. All information gathered is covered by our comprehensive privacy policy. Be careful with your spam filters, since you must be able to receive email from my address to learn if you've won. Remember too, that if someone you refer to this drawing wins, you'll receive the same prize to reward you for spreading the word.

<http://www.tidbits.com/dealbits/dejal-simon/>
<http://www.tidbits.com/about/privacy.html>

 

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