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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

PCalc Adds! (A New Version, That Is)

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PCalc Adds! (A New Version, That Is) -- PCalc is a calculator utility by James Thomson (who also writes DragThing, my favorite launcher). Developing a calculator is something of a thankless task, because users feel that arithmetic is something computers should just know how to do, and because a free calculator utility is always included by default. PCalc, however, has had remarkable staying power; it's been around for a long time, and has usually been the calculator that Apple strives to emulate with each successive version of its calculator. The Tiger version of Apple's calculator threatened to catch up at last, adding reverse Polish notation and hexadecimal/binary mode. Now PCalc strikes back with version 3, adding extensible unit conversions and user functions, plus a superior interface (you can do just about everything without the mouse, plus it looks really slick with all three drawers showing - RPN stack, Unicode, and paper tape). PCalc requires Tiger 10.4.2 (and includes a calculator Dashboard widget); it costs $20 and is a free upgrade for current PCalc users. [MAN]

<http://www.pcalc.com/english/whatsnew.html>

 

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