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Wake On Demand in Snow Leopard

Putting your Mac to sleep saves power, but it also disrupts using your Mac as a file server, among other purposes. Wake on Demand in Snow Leopard works in conjunction with an Apple base station to continue announcing Bonjour services that the sleeping computer offers.

While the requirements for this feature are complex, eligible users can toggle this feature in the Energy Saver preference pane. It's labeled Wake on Network Access for computers that can be roused either via Wi-Fi or Ethernet; Wake on Ethernet Network Access or Wake on AirPort Network Access for wired- or wireless-only machines, respectively. Uncheck the box to disable this feature.

Submitted by
Doug McLean

 

 

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SmileOnMyMac Releases browseback

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SmileOnMyMac Releases browseback -- The Web is a vast place now, and even with search engines like Google, it can be difficult to find something you know you've seen before. SmileOnMyMac has a new take on browsing through the history of your Web surfing with browseback 1.0, which creates PDF thumbnails (they look like playing cards to me) of every page you visit and displays them in animated stacks. It's an elegant presentation, and if you're a visual person, being able to see pictures of pages you've visited may work better than looking at textual lists of page titles and URLs, as St. Clair Software's HistoryHound 1.8 provides. You can still perform full-text searches of the contents of visited pages in browseback, as you can in HistoryHound and OmniWeb 5, and you can also eliminate specific sites from the index to avoid cluttering it with Web-based applications that load numerous nearly identical pages. Once you've found the page you're looking for, you can view it in your Web browser, view the PDF of the page in Preview, save the PDF as a separate file, send the PDF to someone else via email, or print it. To use browseback, you do need Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger, but browseback can track your surfing in all the major Web browsers. It costs $30 and is a 2.4 MB download. [ACE]

<http://www.smileonmymac.com/browseback/>
<http://www.stclairsw.com/HistoryHound/>
<http://www.omnigroup.com/applications/omniweb/>

 

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