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Fill in Gaps in Pear Note

If you ever find yourself zoning out during a meeting or class, only later to realize that you forgot to take notes for 20 minutes, Pear Note makes it easy to fill in those gaps. To do so:

  1. Open your Pear Note document.
  2. Hit play.
  3. Click on the last text you did type to jump to that point in the recording.
  4. Click the lock to unlock the text of the note.
  5. Take notes on the part you missed.

Your new notes will be synced to the recording just as if you'd taken them live with the rest of your notes.

Visit Useful Fruit Software

 

 

Other articles in the series Apple Financials

 

 

Apple Posts $565 Million Q1 2006 Profit

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Well, it's official: Apple is no longer a computer company.

Apple posted its first quarter 2006 financial results last week, with revenue of $5.75 billion and a profit of $565 million for the quarter. The results are a 65 percent increase in revenue over the same quarter a year ago, although the company's gross margin was down to 27.2 percent from 28.5 percent a year ago. International sales accounted for 40 percent of the quarter's revenue. The results are the highest quarterly earnings and revenue in the company's history.

<http://www.apple.com/pr/library/2006/jan/ 18results.html>

To be sure, Apple still makes Macs. The company shipped more than 1.2 million Macintosh computers, basically flat with Mac shipments during the fourth quarter of 2005, but a 20 percent improvement over the same quarter a year ago. Why the static quarter-to-quarter sales figures? Sales in the Americas and among portables were particularly weak, due to an aging notebook product line and the public knowledge that Apple is transitioning from PowerPC to Intel processors, no doubt causing some customers to defer purchases until details of new Intel-based products became available. (In case you missed it, Apple just announced Intel-powered iMacs and MacBook Pro portables at Macworld San Francisco.)

<http://db.tidbits.com/article/08392>

However, in revenue terms, the iPod success story is still unfolding. The company sold more than 14 million iPods during its first fiscal quarter amounting to $2.9 billion in revenue. This figure is significant because roughly half of Apple's quarterly revenue came from iPod sales alone. Roll in money from other music products and services (e.g., the iTunes Music Store, etc.) and Apple's iPod and music businesses accounted for roughly 60 percent of Apple's revenue for the quarter. The quarter marks the first time Apple's non-computer business has out-earned the company's desktop, notebook, software, peripherals and services offerings.

Looking forward, Apple says it expects second quarter revenue to be around $4.3 billion, a conservative figure which sent Apple's share price into a bit of an after-market tumble. The reasons for a cautious revenue figure include a possible slowdown in iPod sales after the holiday buying season, and a pause in Macintosh sales prior to the introduction of Intel-based models. Some analysts are also cautioning the company may not want to become too reliant on income from the turbulent digital music player market.

 

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