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Avoid Long Hierarchical Menus

If you right-click (or Control-click) on some item, such as a file in the Finder, and one of the sub-menus has many options (Open With is a frequent culprit), it may take several seconds to open, even on a fast machine, which is annoying if you did not actually want that sub-menu.

The trick is to not pull the cursor through the menu, but in a curve around it, so the cursor does not touch any menu items until lower on the list where you wanted to go.

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Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

TypeTester Compares Web Typefaces

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If you're the designing type, perhaps you can visualize what different typefaces look like without seeing them on screen. But for people like me, seeing is believing, and whenever I'm looking at creating something for the Web, the trial-and-error process of finding a good combination of font settings always takes longer than I'd like. With the TypeTester, a sleek online application written by Marko Dugonjic, you can ease and speed up that process. (Thanks to Anne-Marie Concepcion for tipping me off to TypeTester in her free DesignGeek newsletter; if you work in design or layout, you should be reading it.)

<http://www.senecadesign.com/designgeek/>

In essence, TypeTester is a Web-based font comparison utility. It provides three columns, each of which can have different specifications, and each of which displays a paragraph of text (Lorem Ipsum is the default, but you can enter your own) in a variety of different styles. Here's how it works. First, choose a typeface from a pop-up menu that helpfully divides them into three categories: typefaces that are available by default for both Mac OS X and Windows, Mac OS X-only defaults, and Windows-only defaults. You can also specify any other typeface loaded on your computer. Second, choose from pop-up menus to set the size, leading, tracking, alignment, word space, decoration, color, and background color (the color picker is truly amazing). As you choose each item, TypeTester automatically restyles the associated column of sample paragraphs using CSS styles. You can then repeat the exercise with the two remaining columns to compare different settings. When you're happy with the settings for a column, there's a link in the Tools tab that provides the related CSS code in a small pop-up window for you to copy and use in your site's CSS file.

<http://typetester.maratz.com/>

TypeTester is free, though Marko is happy to receive donations (check the About tab). I'll definitely be using it next time I'm trying to figure out what typeface to use on a Web site. Give it a look!

 

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