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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 
JesterCapWhat?! Something about this article seems odd? Maybe you should read it again carefully, or double-check the date it was published...
 

Announcing the TidBITS Video Podcast

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Announcing the TidBITS Video Podcast -- One aspect of being an all-digital publication is that we can take advantage of new technologies that are out of the reach of paper publishers. TidBITS is, after all, just lots of digital bits, which can be arranged in a multitude of media. Now, after a fair bit of trial and error, we're happy to announce our new TidBITS Video Podcast.

Publishing a video podcast is not an easy endeavor, due to the many choices that the producer faces: How much live video footage do you use, versus animation or photo slideshows? What type of setting do you use as a backdrop? Do you need extra lighting? And what about audio? What equipment should you use to capture good sound? Do you use background music, and if so, where does it come from (and is it properly licensed)? And finally, how can we create a podcast that captures the ethos and spirit of TidBITS? Fortunately, the TidBITS staff is a talented group of folks, so we were able to tap into my knowledge of video editing, Geoff's experience as a professional musician, and the editorial expertise of the rest of the staff to create a podcast that we're sure will entertain and inform. The TidBITS Video Podcast is free, of course, and available at the URL below; we're in the process of setting up a subscription via iTunes, Safari, or other RSS-capable applications. [JLC]

<http://www.tidbits.com/resources/823/ TbVideoPodcast2.mov>

 

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