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Extract Directly from Time Machine

Normally you use Time Machine to restore lost data in a file like this: within the Time Machine interface, you go back to the time the file was not yet messed up, and you restore it to replace the file you have now.

You can also elect to keep both, but the restored file takes the name and place of the current one. So, if you have made changes since the backup took place that you would like to keep, they are lost, or you have to mess around a bit to merge changes, rename files, and trash the unwanted one.

As an alternative, you can browse the Time Machine backup volume directly in the Finder like any normal disk, navigate through the chronological backup hierarchy, and find the file which contains the lost content.

Once you've found it, you can open it and the current version of the file side-by-side, and copy information from Time Machine's version of the file into the current one, without losing any content you put in it since the backup was made.

Submitted by
Eolake Stobblehouse

 
 

Appeals Court Sides with Mac News Sites over Apple

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Appeals Court Sides with Mac News Sites over Apple -- In a major victory for online news sources, an appeals court ruled last week that Apple could not subpoena email in order to trace the source of leaked trade secrets. In December 2004, PowerPage and Apple Insider posted stories about an unannounced Apple audio product, code-named Asteroid, which included information and drawings leaked from sources inside the company. Apple could not identify the sources of the leaks, and therefore sued "John Does" for breach of confidentiality agreements; as part of the discovery process, Apple sought to subpoena PowerPage's ISP to obtain stored email that might reveal the sources' identities. Apple claimed that the site's owners were not genuine journalists and that, even if they had been, they had no right to protect their anonymous sources. The Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) took up the case, arguing that Apple's attempts to obtain this information violated both federal and California laws. Although a lower court had sided with Apple in March 2005, last week's ruling by the California Court of Appeals overturns that decision. One upshot of last week's ruling is that ISPs cannot be forced to turn over confidential email in response to civil lawsuits - and that apparently applies to everyone, not just journalists. [JK]

<http://www.eff.org/news/archives/2006_ 05.php#004698>
<http://www.eff.org/Censorship/Apple_v_Does/ H028579.pdf>

 

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