Thoughtful, detailed coverage of the Mac, iPhone, and iPad, plus the best-selling Take Control ebooks.

 

 

Pick an apple! 
 
Record Online Meetings in Pear Note

While Pear Note is primarily geared toward recording notes in the physical world, it's possible to use it to record things in the virtual world as well. For instance, you can use it to record and take notes on Skype calls. To do this:

  1. Download Soundflower and install it (along with the Soundflowerbed app that comes with it).
  2. Download LineIn and install it.
  3. Start Soundflowerbed, and select Built-in Output (or whatever output you'd like to listen to the conversation on).
  4. Start LineIn, and select your microphone (e.g. Built-in Mic) as the input and Soundflower (2ch) as the output, then press Pass Thru.
  5. Open Pear Note Preferences, select Recording, and select Soundflower (2ch) as the audio device.
  6. Open Skype Preferences, select Audio, and select Soundflower (2ch) as the audio output and your microphone (e.g. Built-in Mic) as the audio input.
  7. Hit record in Pear Note and make your Skype call.

This will allow you to conduct your Skype call while Pear Note records both your audio and the other participant's.

Visit Useful Fruit Software

 
 

Adam & Tonya Talk About Book Publishing in MacNotables

Send Article to a Friend

Adam & Tonya Talk About Book Publishing in MacNotables -- Tonya and I had another interesting discussion with Chuck Joiner on our MacNotables podcast last week - about what it's like to package a printed book. For those who don't know, there are two basic ways that computer books are created. Normally, an author writes into Word and takes screenshots and sends it all in to the publisher to be edited and laid out. That may seem fairly straightforward, but we've long been using the second approach, in which we do all the layout and editing necessary to provide the publisher with a finished book (we even pay for indexing, though we always hire a professional indexer). Although there's seemingly more work involved in packaging, it's all up front, so there are no nasty surprises caused by errors introduced during editing or layout, and the royalties are higher. So if you're interested in learning about how some of your favorite computer books are made - it's a lot more work than it seems from the outside - give the podcast a listen. [ACE]

<http://macnotables.com/archives/2006/662.html>

 

READERS LIKE YOU! Support TidBITS by becoming a member today!
Check out the perks at <http://tidbits.com/member_benefits.html>
Special thanks to Nicholas Dennys, Darin Ladwig, Matt Perl, and Derek
Lundquist for their generous support!